Community Health Plan

Community Health Needs Assessment for LLUMC-Murrieta

In 2013, Loma Linda University Medical Center—Murrieta completed a triennial Community Health Needs Assessment (CHNA) to gain a better understanding of health status among the residents we serve. The community health needs assessment is conducted not only to fulfill the requirement of the Affordable Care Act and California’s Community Benefit Legislation (SB 697) but in response to the mission of the hospital to further the teaching and healing ministry of Christ. LLUMC—Murrieta is rooted in promoting wholeness and the resulting CHNA was modeled after such a value. This Whole Community Care Model (LLUH, 2013) integrates social determinants of health, health status and behaviors of our community, the environment, and the health systems’ readiness to provide services. Accordingly, LLUMC—Murrieta worked closely with community partners to identify collective evaluation measures to work towards key health indicators as a region and not in isolation.

This document outlines the major indicators of health in Riverside County and identifies priority areas. It represents a collaborative process that views health as a result of intersecting factors; as such a collaborative process will be necessary to overcome identified barriers.

Key Findings

Our assessment highlights that heart disease and stroke remain the leading causes of deaths in the Inland Empire followed by cancer.

  • High rates of 5150’s in Emergency Departments in the Inland Empire and lack of behavioral health services for children highlight the importance of addressing behavioral health in our service area.
  • Our assessment identified a significant lack of adequa
  • The Inland Empire also has one for the poorest air quality indices and poor access to healthy food.
  • Our community understands the importance of healthcare access and utilization of services but lacks adequate resources.

Our Community Health Priorities

After conducting the CHNA we asked the following questions: 1) What is really hurting our communities? 2) How can we make a difference? 3) What are the high impact interventions? 4) Who are our partners? and 5) Who needs our help the most? From this analysis, three priority areas were identified:

  • Whole Child Care
  • Whole Behavioral Care
  • Whole Chronic Disease Care

Moving forward, these priority areas will be used to guide the development of a Community Health Plan, with initiatives designed to address these concerns. Building a healthy community requires multiple stakeholders working together with a common purpose. We invite you to explore our health challenges in the Inland Empire outlined in this report. More importantly though, we hope you use the findings in this report to conceptualize collective solutions, establish sustainable partnerships, and work towards a healthier Inland Empire.

Community Health Needs Assessment for Loma Linda University Medical Center & Behavioral Medicine Center

In 2013, Loma Linda University Health (LLUH) completed a triennial Community Health Needs Assessment (CHNA) to gain a better understanding of health status among the residents we serve. The community health needs assessment is conducted not only to fulfill the requirement of the Affordable Care Act and California’s Community Benefit Legislation (SB 697) but in response to the mission of the hospital to further the teaching and healing ministry of Christ. LLUH is rooted in promoting wholeness and the resulting CHNA was modeled after such a value. This Whole Community Care Model (LLUH, 2013) integrates social determinants of health, health status and behaviors of our community, the environment, and the health systems’ readiness to provide services. Accordingly, LLUH worked closely with community partners to identify collective evaluation measures to work towards key health indicators as a region and not in isolation.

This document outlines the major indicators of health in San Bernardino and Riverside Counties and identifies priority areas. It represents a collaborative process that views health as a result of intersecting factors; as such a collaborative process will be necessary to overcome identified barriers.

Key Findings

  • Our assessment highlights that heart disease and stroke remain the leading causes of deaths in the Inland Empire followed by cancer.
  • Sickle cell disease was also a health issue that emerged during our assessment.
  • Childhood obesity rates remain high in inland Empire.
  • Our community also suffers from high rates of poverty (especially among children), low educational attainment, and low social stability (low housing and high violence) making the physical environment less conducive to healthy outcomes.
  • The Inland Empire also has one for the poorest air quality indices and poor access to healthy food.
  • Our community members know the importance of healthy lifestyle, but often lack adequate resources.

LLUMC & BMC Community Health Priorities

After conducting the CHNA we asked the following questions: 1) What is really hurting our communities? 2) How can we make a difference? 3) What are the high impact interventions? 4) Who are our partners? And 5) Who needs our help the most? From this analysis, several priority areas were identified:

  • Children’s Health
  • Chronic Disease with a special emphasis on Heart Disease
  • Sickle Cell Disease
  • Aging Care
  • Behavioral Health

Moving forward, these priority areas will be used to guide the development of a Community Health Plan, with initiatives designed to address these concerns. Building a healthy community requires multiple stakeholders working together with a common purpose. We invite you to explore our health challenges in the Inland Empire outlined in this report. More importantly though, we hope you use the findings in this report to conceptualize collective solutions, establish sustainable partnerships, and work towards a healthier Inland Empire.

Community Health Plan

We call upon you to imagine a healthier region, and invite you to work with us implementing the solutions outlined in this report. Help us continue to prioritize our health concerns and find solutions across a broad range of health needs.